The Ultimate Woven Wrap Carry Resource

Glossary

Feeling overwhelmed with all the terminology that comes with wrapping? Don't worry – you've come to the right place! This glossary will make everything clear.

Acronyms
Wrap Sizes
Common Terms
Pass Types
Pass Properties
Wrap Parts

Acronyms

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Wrap Sizes

Wraps are usually sold by size instead of by length. (There are some notable exceptions: for example, until recently, Vatanai sold wraps in multiples of half-meter.) Wrap sizes go up by half a meter with each size. The following is a listing of common sizes. (For the nerds among us, the formula for Size N is 1.7 + 0.5N meters.)

Size Meters Inches Feet and Inches
1 2.2 m 86.6 in 6 ft 14.6 in
2 2.7 m 106.3 in 8 ft 10.3 in
3 3.2 m 126.0 in 10 ft 6.0 in
4 3.7 m 145.7 in 12 ft 1.7 in
5 4.2 m 165.4 in 13 ft 9.4 in
6 4.7 m 185.0 in 15 ft 5.0 in
7 5.2 m 204.7 in 17 ft 0.7 in
8 5.7 m 224.4 in 18 ft 8.4 in
9 6.2 m 244.1 in 20 ft 4.1 in

How to Measure

To measure wrap length, you measure along a single horizontal edge, which means that only one taper is included in the length, not both!

Measuring should be done soft tape in hand (STIH), as shown in this video. Do not measure with a ruler or a hard tape measure, or your measurements may be quite off:


What's "My Size"?



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Common Terms

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Pass Types

Pass: Position: Visuals:
Kangaroo or ruck pass

Kangaroo on front, ruck on back.
Over both of wearer's shoulders.

Over baby's legs.
Spread:
Bunched:
Traditional sling pass

Also known as sling or TS pass, formerly known as rebozo pass.
Over one of wearer's shoulders.

Over baby's legs.
Spread:
Bunched:
Cross pass

Known as wiggleproof pass when wrapped from bottom to top.
Over one of wearer's shoulders.

Under one of baby's legs.
Spread:
Bunched:
Horizontal pass

Also known as torso pass.
Under both of wearer's shoulders.

Over baby's legs.
Spread:
Bunched:
Reinforcing pass

Under both of wearer's shoulders.

Under one of baby's legs.
Spread:
Bunched:

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Pass Properties

Good for Leg Straightening? Good for Leaning?
Spread kangaroo or ruck pass

No. Very.
Spread traditional sling pass

No. Yes.

Works best on the side going over the shoulder.
Spread cross pass Very.

If not hammocked, then only good for the leg it goes under. If hammocked, helps on both sides.
No.
Spread horizontal pass

No. Somewhat.

Good for mild leaning.
Spread reinforcing pass

Yes, but ONLY as an inner pass of a carry!

If it is the outermost pass of a carry, it will only hold up to very mild leg straightening.
No.
All bunched passes

Somewhat.

Good for moderate leg straightening for the legs that the pass goes over.
No.

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Wrap Parts

To explain the parts of a wrap, we will need both a flat shot of the wrap and a shot of a wrap in a carry. We will use a rainbow wrap, as that helps with the visualization. Here's a flat shot of the wrap:

The rails are strips of wrap running along the two long edges of the wrap. They are a few inches wide and they span the entire length. Note that a rail is NOT the edge itself. In the picture above, the rails correspond approximately to the red strip and the purple strip. In a spread pass, one of the rails would be the bottom rail, and one would be the top rail.

The tapers are the parts of the wrap that are above the slanted ends. The tapers are highlighted in the above picture.

The middle marker marks the center of the wrap. It is most often a small tag, although some wraps have visual middle markers (a change in the pattern.)

Note that the middle marker is not in the middle of the *edge*, because of the presence of the tapers. To find where the middle marker should be, imagine a line through the midline of the wrap (in the diagram, it is between the yellow stripe and the green stripe, horizontally across the length of the wrap.) Now find the halfway point of this midline – this is center of the wrap. Start at the center of the wrap and go straight up to the edge. This is where the middle marker should be.

Some wraps have two middle markers, one on each edge, and some have one. I far prefer having two, it makes them easier to find!

Now, here's a picture of the same wrap in a carry (in this particular case, Front Wrap Cross Carry tied under bum.)

The tails of the wrap are the parts of the wrap which hang down after the carry is secured, by either a knot (like here) or by a knotless finish.

Now let's focus on the inner (horizontal) wrap pass. The top rail of a pass is the rail that is by the baby's neck and shoulders. In this picture, the top rail of the horizontal pass is the red rail. The bottom rail is the rail by the baby's knees. In this picture, the bottom rail of the horizontal pass is the purple rail.

Note that in a multipass carry, the top rail on one pass may be the bottom rail on the next pass – the rails can switch places. This particular carry only has one spread pass for simplicity's sake, but our next picture will show a carry in which the top rail and bottom rail switch places.

Here's a picture of our wrap in Rear Reinforced Ruck (RRR), also known as Pirate Carry. This carry has an inner ruck pass and an outer horizontal pass. The way the carry is wrapped in the picture, the top rail of the ruck pass is red and the top rail of the horizontal pass is purple, and vice versa for the bottom rails.

It is also possible to wrap this carry without flipping top and bottom rails. However, this picture should make it clear that different passes can have different top rails. This means that the wrap itself doesn't have a top and a bottom rail. Only a particular pass has those!

By the way, flipping rails between passes can actually be a useful trick that changes the feel of a carry. At some point, I will post an article about this trick!

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